British cinema

Forget Jurassic World, it's Killersaurus!

KillerSaurus

You have to frankly applaud anybody who tries to make a dinosaur movie on a budget of half a takeaway pizza and a couple of postage stamps. So the writer / director Steve Lawson – a familiar figure in the world of contemporary British horror thanks

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It's not exactly Wolf Creek... Dartmoor Killing

The Dartmoor Killing

One of the problems faced by British filmmakers – or more particularly English filmmakers – when making a horror movie is that, to be honest, it’s very difficult to think of anywhere… out of the way.


Kalahari calamari in Monsters: Dark Continent

Monsters: Dark Continent

Monsters: Dark Continent got a bit of a pasting when it was released; inevitable, really, considering that it was a sequel to a film which both critics and audiences had taken an unexpected shine to.


The action reaches fever pitch in Esperienza...

Esperienza

Although made for a preposterously small budget (just twenty thousand euros) and, well, nothing much happening for the entire running time, Francesco Vona’s Esperienza is one of the more effective Italian films that I have seen in recent years.


Napoleonic zombies in Fallen Soldiers

Fallen Soldiers

Considering that the world and it’s dog (and even the dogs favorite stick) are bored to tears with Nazi zombie films, Fallen Soldiers does a neat trick by giving us, well… Napoleonic zombies


A quieter than usual day on Brighton beach then... Darkest Day

Darkest Day

Darkest Day answers one of those burning questions that’s at the heart of so many horror films today: what could possibly be worse than a global apocalypse?


A little homage to Dario Argento's Creepers in The Duke of Burgundy

The Duke of Burgundy

At some point in the mid 1970s, narrative became king in cinema. The lyrical, semi-improvised and let’s be quite honest self-indulgent European art cinema made way for more muscular, focused productions from the likes of Scorsese and Coppola.